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for better u.s.-china relationships. now, the open china you and president nixon made in early 1970's, was not only a turning point in history, but also it has changed our lives, for millions of people, chinese, chinese americans, and americans. thank you very much, doctor kissinger. [applause] now, one of the things you have taught us is to better understand chinese politics, or how to develop a broader vision. we have to have a deeper understanding of chinese politics, society, behaviors, political systems. let me come to the question you raised. i am disappointed, not what the leadership, but rather disappointed with the social media. it is fair to say that the chinese government said several times in a press conference and to foreign delegates that vice- president shi was injured in his back. i think that is enough. more importantly, i was interviewed many times by the media. i say i do not want to comment. there is nothing happening. they would cancel their trip. the police and the military would react unusual. there is no sign whatsoever. it seems like it is very odd that the ch
with john f. kennedy facing vice-president nixon. the next debates were not until 1976. a commission was set up to run the debates. at town hall format was introduced in 1992, which will be the format for the second debate. -- a town hall format was introduced in 1992. that will take place october 16. the final debate returns to the moderator and candidates on october 22 at lynn university of florida. on the panel today to discuss going beyond winning and losing, and we will move from my immediate left, correspondent of the new york times, abc news and nbc news and participant in the first televised debate in 1960 in chicago. and the grower, washington post contributing writer. ndy grower " washington post" contributing writer. michael hogan. charles mack gokalain. catherine olsen, univ. of wisconsin milwaukee and director of the schools frederick program. thank you all for being with us today. we will begin the program today with a bit of advice for those of you here in the studio and those of you watching for following this on twitter. when we go to questions, there are two microphones and
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney bbecause there s an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the government -- as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak such -- to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 -- 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is that a really
1972. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, he needed to end the vietnam war. and this was sort of the definetive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election despite president carter's efforts. instead they were freed as soon as rsh was inaugurated setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan elm sears back chanld with iran in delaying freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in that jimmy carter was a stumbling ineffective pr
approval. remember nixon was criticized going to cambodia. everyone blasted him and blasted bush. at least saddam hussein had a trial. where are the liberals speaking out on that? >> eric: last thought, is president obama succeeding or failing in foreign policy? >> bob: succeeding. >> eric: that's what i thought. latest on libya, was it coverup or incompetence? is the president leading from the talk show couch? >> the annual u.n. media where rogue nations are calling for a new world order. obama snub key allies and skipped meetings with world leaders so he could be on tv. >> we brought cloth napkins as well. i want to be eye candy here. >> eric: new ad calls out obama for gabbing with the gals of "the view" instead of the intel people. dana is on deck next. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> dana: new ad by the super pac american crossroad look at obama's foreign affairs and preoccupation being on popular television shows. >> what did president obama do the same day of a terror attack on american citizens? he campaigned in las vegas. then at the annual u.n. meeting where rogue nations are calling
do. >>> the candidates need no introduction. the republican candidate vice president richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i would hope he would grant me the same. the question before us is, which point of view and which party do we want to lead the united states? >> mr. nixon, would you like to comment on that statement? >> i have no comment. >> the sweat pooling onyxen's chin while kennedy is over there cold chillin'. was the presidential race decided right there because of heavy perspiration on the vice presidential mug? can you see who won the first televised presidential debate with the sound off or is that an oversimplification of a slew of factor sfls do campaigns matter or does the man with the best platform for that moment in history actually win? our next guest studied the last six decades of campaignsin exploring thorg. how campaigns do and do not matter. christopher, how are you? >> great. >> i'm of the school that campaigns do matter. that you have to present your ideas and present
. >> john f. kennedy, a young senator from massachusetts, facing off against vice president richard nixon, who is known to be a fierce debater. but on screen, kennedy looks cool and calm, while nixon looks uncomfortable, sweating profusely under the hot studio lights. nixon flounders under the glare of television for all four debates. kennedy goes on to win the election. in 1976, president gerald ford makes this blunder in his debate with georgia govern oor jimmy carter. >> there is no soviet domination of eastern europe and there never will be under a ford administration. >> i'm sorry, could i just -- >> the remark becomes a central theme in carter's campaign and is blamed by many for costing ford the election. in 1980, ronald reagan is repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> but reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> four years later, president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age duri
is just three days away. not the first debate ever. the first was 1960 with kennedy/nixon. mitt romney and barack obama will be live from denver. it is serious business, but there are also two games being played here. there's the expectations game the two campaigns have been playing. then there's the game of dodge ball. that's what we're talking about this morning. joining me now live is todd rogers. he's an assistant professor at harvard's kennedy school. thank you very much for joining us. >> hi, gary. thanks for having me. >> the artful dodge. what is that all about? >> so with a collaborator here at harvard, we've been doing psychological experiments to understand how its they politicians manage to evade questions without being detected so we've run a series of these experiments where viewers are randomly assigned to one of three conditions. in one condition they watch a video where a moderator asks a question that say as what will you do about the universal health care problem in the world. the politician said, i'll glad you asked me that. we need universal health care. we then sp
history of the vietnam war known as "the pentagon papers" when nixon administration demanded h he stop publishing the article, the paper refused. he was 86 years old. >>> we're back in a moment with some final thoughts from afghanistan. and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communities across the country. we hired three thousand people just last year. bp invests more in america than in any other country. in fact, over the last five years, no other energy company has invested more in the us than bp. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. today, o
the debates were first televised the first rule is appearances count. nixon should have shaved. al bush shouldn't have sighed. and the camera never blinks. challengers can benefit just by being on the stage with an incumbent president. >> are you better off than you were four years ago? >> reporter: it helps to have a well rehearsed one-liner. >> governor, there you go again. >> reporter: most memorably, lloyd bentsen's takedown of dan quayle in 1988. >> jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you're no jack kennedy. >> reporter: but beware that deer in the head lights moment when a candidate forgets he's expected to be human. >> governor, if kitty dukakis were raped and murdered, would you favor an irrevocable death penalty for the killer? >> no, i don't, bernard. >> i feel sorry for these candidates because there's a bunch of people sitting around a room right now telling them to do ten impossible things and then at the end saying be yourself. >> reporter: and if you lose the first round you can recover at the next match with a well executed zinger. >> i am not going to exploit fo
? the answer 1960 and the famous kennedy-nixon debate. there won't be another one until gerald ford and jimmy carter until 1976. the first presidential debate coming up wednesday. as always, both sides playing the expectations game. tamping down a little bit. let me bring back maria cardona and amy holmes. amy, as you see it, who's got the advantage, president obama who's done so many, or mitt romney who frankly had to do it just to get the nomination? >> exactly. well, the president obviously has the incumbent advantage and he's been president the last four years and dealt with these issues on the front lines at 1600 pennsylvania avenue. as you mentioned, mitt romney as the gop nominee, he had to go through quite a gauntlet. i'm not sure that one person has the edge over the other. i think the question will be, you know, who gets off the best line and who's able to address the voters' concerns most directly and most pervasively. >> maria, same question. who do you think has the edge? a lot of people have been saying, mitt, where are the details? who do you think that is advantage right now?
. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon in 1960, even reagan and carter in 1980, the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked defensive. that's the impression that often lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush is a good example of body language so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effe effective, aggressive debater. he was seen in the first debate as too aggressive. the sighs and the rest. in the second debate he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a just right approach by that time. those performances and all the other factors in the 2000 election held him back. >> humor. >> humor can be very important but it's something that has to -- some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again, reagan, most people feel, was prepared. >> remember what lloyd benson said about -- >> yes. >> dan quayle. >> that famous line. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you are no jack kennedy. >> i just reread about
these other people were squabbling amongst each other. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon. even reagan and carter in 1980. the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked a little bit defensive. that's the impression that lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush i think is a good example of body language told so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effective, aggressive debater. in the first debate, he was seen as being too aggressive. the famous sighs and all the rest. in the second debate, he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a kind of just right approach, but by that time, those performances and all the other factors in the 2011 election held him back. >> how important is humor? >> it can be very important, but it's something that has to -- i guess some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again by reagan most people feel w prepared. that, of course, is the magic. >> remember what lloyd benson said about dan quayle and pres
be johnson and richard nixon, the warren commission in that meeting, lbj tells madeleine brown after tomorrow the kennedys will never embarrass me again. that is the promise. >> guest: lyndon johnson was never at the meeting you are talking about. all the times i was working -- i have been working on lyndon johnson going through any kind of his papers and diaries and letters talking to everybody who knew him i have never found a single hinge that in and johnson had anything to do with the assassination. >> host: do you find yourself answering conspiracy questions regularly? >> guest: yes. yes. my only answer is the answer i gave. i would pursue anything that i found. >> guest: >> host: a viewer wanted to do about valid stocks 13. what kind of question is that? >> guest: the ballot box with which lyndon johnson's old reelection. six days after running for the senate in 1948, six day after the election he is still behind. suddenly a ballot box from precinct, found in the desert. it contains a number of votes. if i have this right 2 in hundred two votes. interesting votes because they are writte
president richard nixon who is known to be a fierce debater. on screen kennedy looks cool and calm. while nixon looks uncomfortable, sweating profusely under the hot studio lights. >> think i better shave. >> reporter: nixon flounders. kennedy goes on to win the election. in 1976, president gerald ford makes this blunder in the debate with carter. >> will is not soviet domination of eastern europe and there never will be under a ford administration. >> i'm sorry. could i just -- >> reporter: the remark becomes a central theme in carter's campaign and blamed by many costing ford the emphasis. ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> reporter: reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> reporter: four years later president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age during his debate with walter mondale. >> i want to you know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am n
. which leads to lesson three -- appearances count, above all. jfk. tan. nixon? just out of the hospital, pale and refusing professional makeup. lighting counts, too. in 1984, reagan's people fussed more over his, man mondale's did over his. and reagan always had a glass of wine just before going on to get the rosy cheeks. lesson four. real debating? so far, after 52 years, not actually required here, so, relax. learn your lines and don't speak in a look at your wristwatch because that will definitely hurt you. besides, 90 minutes and you're done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> and we're so glad you were watching. you may have noticed some differences here in our studio. let us hear from you at abcnews.com. and, of course, "nightline" will be along later. as we leave you tonight, with a look at the white house, aglow in pink in honor of breast cancer awareness month. we'll see you again tomorrow. until then, good night. >>> next at 6:00 disbelief in a albany school. the death of a teacher at the center of a student sex scandal. also. >> i am not now intimidated
presidential campaigns since 1968. and humphrey and nixon. so i've been watching debates throughout the years, and it's my super bowl. i mean, i get all excited. i'm so thrilled that the debate is tomorrow, i can hardly wait. so i have observed many of the debates, not just based on my experience, but there is always something, people, after i did the debate, would come and tell me that they were concerned about things that the candidates did. >> like what? >> not what they said. >> like looking at a watch? >> like george bush looking at his watch, and standing near his stool the entire debate. and bill clinton wading right up to the audience questioners showing his compassion and feeling for these people. and it jumped through the screen. and i've had people -- i've had people, you know, these days, telling me, i want to see how they do. it is not -- i want it hear what they have to say about how to solve the economy. they want to see how they do. and i think a lot of things -- the conventional wisdom is that all the debates do is reinforce your ideas about a candidate that you support, or d
's got to score. >> there was a time between the famous kennedy-nixon tapes that there were no televised debates. why are they considered so vital now? >> well, the kennedy-nixon debates created so much attention in 1960. many people think that's why ted kennedy won. if you recall ford made famously the gap that -- and then certainly by 1980, ronald reagan was very behind in the polls was just able to tidal wave over jimmy carter with quips like there you go again in a sort of staged format. since 1980, they have become part of the american landscape. >> the "new york times" recently wrote about this debate prep and the president of the united states is an awesome figure merely to share the platform with him on equal terms is the gain in stature, good performance will be gauged even better. why would any president agree to participate in an event that ultimately -- the -- because it's become now a demand, president obama suddenly bailed on debates. then, you know, he would be seeming like a poor sport. and also these debates are agreed upon long before the fall season, they're everything
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
was assigned to conduct the first mission to china. largely because president nixon felt that if he went through regular channels, he would be overwhelmed with a lot of technical details on subjects he considered not up to the immediate challenge, and he could be sure i cannot overwhelm him with details. so when i first came to china, i had an experience which is perhaps unique in this sense -- every visitor to china would have killed for the privilege of meeting chairman mao. i was terrified of having to do it for the reason that i knew that president nixon wanted to be the first policymaker who met mao. i knew my life would not be worth living if i came back having done the first photograph of an american with chairman mao. chairman mao had given instructions that if i requested a meeting with him, i should be taken to him immediately. i went through enormous contortions not to request a meeting. [laughter] and so i achieved that goal of my visit. i've met, of course, each generation of chinese leaders. reflected theaem mission and the conditions of his period. mao was a revolutionary,
. largely, because president nixon felt if he went through regular channels, he'd be overwhelmed with a lot of technical details on subjects he considered not central to the immediate challenge, and he could be sure i couldn't overwhelm him with details. [laughter] when i first came to china, i had an experience which is, perhaps unique in this sense -- every visitor to china would have killed for the privilege of meeting chairman mao. i was terrified of having to do it for the reason that i knew that president nixon wanted to be the first policymaker who met him. .. each generation of chinese leader. and each of that reflected the mission and the conditions of experience. now is revolutionary, a prophet consumed by the object is here that recognize no obstacles in terms of eligibility. the standard literalistic language of american diplomacy, he brought me to ina in his mind is that china had to find a possibility of having the barbarians, the more distant barbarians. in other words, how the united states balance the soviet union. that was his strategic objective . the people with great st
was behind the crash, but witnesses say it took just seconds for nixon's car to run a stop sign on indian street and go into the water. >> i looked over. i saw the car. it was coming through the parking lot. looked like it was barrelling pretty fast. and then i saw it go over the edge and water come up. that scared me. >> but he was among those who went straight into the water. others called 911. >> it was nerve wracking. kind of chaotic in trying to figure it out. trying to call for help. >> police happen to be on patrol next door. firefighters were training in ocean gateway. they got to the water. this was a true team effort. you can see even as he approaches the car an unidentified woman completely pulled nixon out. >> without the efforts of the bystanders, it might have been a completely different outcome. >> paramedics used rows to pull her out of the water. many who jumped in, had to be treated for hypo thermia. everyone was feeling lucky. >> everybody did a good job helping out. >> nixon is badly hurt but in stable condition. thanks to a little bit of luck and a lot of caring witne
out. >> i mean nixon and sparrow agnew perfected it in the '60s and '70s we're the pointy headed intellectuals and turned the notion of the elite being big business and those people that make the decisions those liberals who want to tell you how to live and where to send your children to school. >> you saw it with president obama where the first african-american president who has credentials, very much like every other president, ivy league education, all of that sort of thing, suddenly gets framed in this way that his intellectual accomplishments are inappropriate and instead what we saw was a kind of populism that emerged from the mccain and palin campaign in '08 to push back against that. we're seeing a renewal of that. >> mitt romney -- >> joint degrees from harvard. >> exactly. doesn't really match with this candidate but there's a way in which it emerges in '08. >> so used to using it. >> about the attacking academic credentials when you counted up in 2008 how often people's education was specifically cited in major newspaper articles, barack obama's time at harvard went ov
richard nixon a long time to come out of hiding. and i'm not sure that he ever came back and spoke at a convention. >> paul glastris, author of "elephant in the room," thank you so much for your time today. it sounds like a fascinating read. full disclosure here, i have only started it. they keep me pretty busy here, paul. hope to get around to the whole thing. >> hope you enjoy it. >> coming up, what beer you drink has to say about your politics. all of a sudden, the folks here on the floor have all perked up. >>> a little bit later, accusations politics in missouri have become unladylike. this is msnbc. [ male announcer ] let's say you need to take care of legal matters. wouldn't it be nice if there was an easier, less-expensive option than using a traditional lawyer? well, legalzoom came up with a better way. we took the best of the old and combined it with modern technology. together you get quality services on your terms, with total customer support. legalzoom documents have been accepted in all 50 states, and they're backed by a 100% satisfaction guarantee. so go to legalzoom
is not where people want it to be. >> we have a great candidate in missouri named jay nixon. he will be re-elected because he focuses on jobs. >> you are already holding that seat, though. it's the ones you might lose that are worrisome. >> akin is going to lose because of a demonstrated anti-woman policy that they have in the republican party where one month a senator says he will not endorse akin, and then the next month he says he will endorse him. >> what i said was that the national issues are big enough that we need to have a discussion of those issues rather than ones that todd managed to bring to the table. >> which hopefully will be more favorable than the ones that he brought up. >> it's about the majority and let's see how todd does. >> senator blunt, governor o'malley, thank you. >>> governor romney steps up his attack on president obama's economy. is romney on the right path to get back in the race? ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to s
for an awful lot of people. it made america the envy of the world and let richard nixon go to moscow and tell the soviet leader we have a classless society. >> suarez: that is also... the people living that dream are also numerically the largest part of the united states. how did they become so politically weak? >> well, they were very strong back then. as you know, ray, the environmental movement was strong, put pressure on washington. the labor movement was strong, put pressure on general motors and general electric and the u.s. steel and so forth. the civil rights movement put pressure on washington to open up the american dream to blacks and other minorities. part of what happened to them was it was so successful. but part of what happened to them was there was a power shift. there was a tremendous change of power in washington, and that had big effect on the ability of middle class americans to achieve the american dream. the other thing that happened is what i call wedge economics. the splitting of the american middle class off from the games of the national economy. so that today you c
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)

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